My Dog Drank Hot Spring Water What Should I Do?

Reviewed By Julie •  Updated: 10/09/21 •  3 min read
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Dog Drank Hot Spring Water

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Are you planning on taking your dog for a hike near hot springs? Then you may want to read this first! Hot springs can be dangerous for dogs!

Has your dog drunk hot spring water? Are you worried that the hot spring water will make your dog sick? If so, then you’ve come to the right place. We understand it can be scary when your dog drinks something like this.

In this article, we’ll take a look at hot spring water and whether it can make a dog sick. Let’s get started!

What is Hot Spring Water?

Hot springs are natural features that contain groundwater that’s heated. The water may be warm and comfortable for humans, or it may be hotter than boiling water. Geothermal forces heat the water and bring it to the surface. Some hot spring water may become diluted with cooler water, depending on where the water comes to the surface and if cooler water also flows into the same space as the heated spring water.

You’ve probably heard about or seen the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park and other areas of the US. Many spa towns in the US are located near natural hot springs, where people can enjoy soaking in the warm, soothing water.

However, you never really know how hot the spring water may be. In many areas, you may find signs that say to keep out of the water as it can burn and scald. The signs may also warn that it’s necessary to keep a dog on the leash at all times in the area.

It can happen, though, that a dog gets loose and heads directly for a hot spring. The dog doesn’t know the water can hurt him and may take a drink if he’s thirsty.

But can hot spring water make a dog sick?

Hot Spring Water & Dogs

Unfortunately, it is possible for hot spring water to burn and scald a dog very badly. There have been recent news stories about dogs even jumping into a hot spring and being scalded. Some dogs may be thirsty and want a drink. Other dogs love water and will jump into almost any body of water they find!

For this reason, it’s best to avoid taking your dog into areas where there are hot springs. If you really want to take him along, then keep your dog on the leash at all times. Again, you want to avoid your dog getting anywhere near the hot springs.

What’s more, be sure to pack plenty of water for your hike. You and your dog need to stay hydrated. And if a dog is hydrated, he may not be as likely to dry to drink from a hot spring.

If your dog has drunk water out of a hot spring, then call the vet immediately. Your dog will have burns that need to be treated ASAP!

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Julie

Julie is a graduate of the University of North Carolina, Wilmington, where she studied Animal science. Though contrary to the opinion of her parents she was meant to study pharmacy, but she was in love with animals especially cats. Julie currently works in an animal research institute (NGO) in California and loves spending quality time with her little cat. She has the passion for making research about animals, how they survive, their way of life among others and publishes it. Julie is also happily married with two kids.

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