My Dog Ate Grub Killer What Should I Do?

By Kyoko •  Updated: 03/31/21 •  3 min read
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Do you have a grub problem? Are you considering using grub killer but are afraid it may harm your dog? Has your dog eaten grub killer? If you’re dealing with these issues, then you’ve come to the right place.

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In this article, we’ll take a look at what grubs are, grub killers, and whether or not they’re toxic to dogs. Let’s get started!

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What are Grubs?

Grubs are a pest that attacks the roots of a lawn. They’re also known as grub worms, lawn grubs, white grubs, and turf grubs. They cause a lot of damage to the lawn, especially if there’s a large infestation.

While many people refer to these pests as grub worms, they’re not really worms. They are the larval stage of different beetles. Grubs are an off-white color, with a reddish-orange head and six legs just behind their heads. They’re also c-shaped, and their bodies are shiny.

Grubs belong to the scarab family of beetles and can turn into Japanese beetles, June beetles, Oriental beetles, or Northern & Southern masked chafers.

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By now, you’re probably feeling creepy & crawly. We apologize for that, but it’s important you know what we’re talking about!

If your lawn is infested with grub worms, you may notice patches of dead grass. These can rolled bag, showing the grub worms underneath. Yuck!

Grub Worm Prevention & Dogs

There are different ways to get rid of grub worms. One of these is through the use of insecticides that target these pests. Grub killers, unfortunately, can be toxic to dogs.

For one thing, the freshly applied insecticides can get on your dog’s paws. He may then lick his paws and ingest the poison that way. Some dogs like to eat grub works; if the grubs have been treated with insecticide and your dog eats them, he could become poisoned.

Insecticide Poisoning in Dogs

You may notice these symptoms if your dog has been poisoned by grub insecticide:

If your dog is showing any of these symptoms, then it’s time to call the vet. This is a medical emergency.

Getting your dog to the vet as soon as possible is imperative with any type of insecticide poisoning. The reason is that the poison must not be allowed to be absorbed by your dog’s body. The vet has several treatments to use that keep the toxins from being absorbed.

To avoid this problem in the future, it’s best to always keep your dog away from areas that have just been treated with insecticide. And if he eats grubs, then it’s best to use a natural treatment or one that is safe for pets.

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Kyoko

Kyoko is from a family of 3 and moved to New York with her parents and siblings when she was 13. Kyoko is fond of spending a great amount of time with pets, specifically her beagle Luna and cat Missy. Her boyfriend often complains that she spends too much time giving attention to their animals. Kyoko has written dozens of articles concerning pets and is aiming at owning a pet shop one day!

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