My Dog Ate Apricot Pits What Should I Do?

By Tom •  Updated: 02/08/21 •  3 min read
The contents of the OurFitPets.com website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on this site (“Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinarian advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian with any questions you may have regarding the medical condition of your pet. Never disregard professional advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website!

Apricots are yummy fruits that are a huge favorite for many in the summer! Dogs also love this fruit. Thankfully the fruit itself safe for your dog. Apricots are filled with lots of nutrients that necessary for both you and your dog.

Online Veterinary 24/7
Chat With A Veterinarian Online

Connect with a verified veterinarian in minutes. No waiting for appointments or office hours. No high fees. No need to worry about your furry family member.

But what the apricot pit? Can an apricot pit poison your dog? Will an apricot pit make your dog sick?

Can My Dog Be Lactose Intolerant?
Can My Dog Be Lactose Intolerant?

Apricot Pits

Apricot pits contain the seeds of the apricot. Pits are used in many ways. For instance, the kernel (pit) is a by-product of processing the fruit. The pits can be made into soap, medication, and soaps.

Apricot Pits & Dogs

When you eat apricots, you usually throw them in the trash. That’s where they should be; however, your fur baby can easily access the pits, which is not a good thing.

This is because apricot pits contain cyanides, which are a group of substances. Cyanide is a very strong, deadly poison.

Online Veterinary 24/7
Chat With A Veterinarian Online

Connect with a verified veterinarian in minutes. No waiting for appointments or office hours. No high fees. No need to worry about your furry family member.

Why do plants contain cyanide? This is because cyanide is used as a defense, to keep insects and animals from eating them. This is a type of natural plant defense. In fact, cyanide is found in other fruits, nuts, and veggies including almonds, apples, lima beans, bamboo shoots, barley, peaches, cherries, and flaxseed.

Apricot pits can be toxic to dogs, so you want to keep your dog away from the pits. Accidents do happen, however. Dogs can be really quiet when they’re after something they want! If your dog can easily access or open the wastebasket, then he could potentially decide to eat the pit.

Symptoms of Cyanide Poisoning in Dogs

You may notice these symptoms if your dog has eaten apricot pits:

If you notice these symptoms in your dog, call your vet right now. This is a medical emergency.

Remember to try to determine how many pits your dog may have eaten, and let the vet know.

Treatment of Cyanide Poisoning in Dogs

When you reach the vet’s, they will perform a physical exam of your dog. The vet will also run lab work and other tests that may be required.

If the diagnosis is cyanide poisoning, the vet may treat your dog with an antidote that’s called sodium thiosulfate and sodium nitrate. When given in time, these medications can save the dog. Your dog may need oxygen therapy, too, which is usually given at the same time as the antidote.

Other medications will be used to treat the other symptoms your dog is having.

Recovery will depend on how much of the cyanide your dog has had, and the length of time it took to obtain medical treatment. With prompt medical treatment, it is possible for dogs to go on to a full recovery.

(Visited 3,658 times, 1 visits today)

Tom

Tom has always loved to write since he was little - he wanted to be either a writer or a veterinary doctor, but he ended up being a professional writer while most of his works are based on animals. He was born in San Francisco but later moved to Texas to continue his job as a writer. He graduated from the University of San Francisco where he studied biotechnology. He is happily married and a soon to be father!

Keep Reading

[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]