50 Spices Inspired Dog Names

By Kim •  Updated: 01/25/21 •  9 min read
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Dog names can be inspired by any number of things—from favorite characters in books and movies, to your favorite songs, foods and more. But have you thought about a spice inspired dog name?

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Are you looking for just the right name for your new dog or puppy? Then you’ve come to the right place. We’ve done some research to find some unique dog names inspired by spices! We have to warn you—this article may make you hungry?

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OK, now let’s get on to those cute dog names based on the wonderful spices we enjoy!

Spices Dog Names Male

Here are some spices dog names for boy dogs!

1). Pepper: is the name of a hot-tasting spice that comes from dried and ground peppercorns. It can be made from white, black, red, and other types of peppers.

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2). Wasabi: is a type of Japanese horseradish. The plant come from the Brassicaceae family, which includes horseradish, mustard, and others.

3). Dill: is an annual herb that’s related to celery! The leaves of this plant are used in many dishes around the world. In the Czech Republic, dill is used in lovely sauces for dumplings and meat.

4). Vanilla: this spice comes from orchids that mostly come from Mexico. The orchid plants grow pods that are dried. A Spanish conquistador is credited with bringing this spice back to the Old World.

5). Bay: these are leaves that come from the Bay Laurel plant, which are dried and ground, then used in a variety of dishes, including Italian foods.

6). Pimento: is made from the Jamaican pepper and is also known as all spice. The berries of the plant are dried and ground to make the spice. The taste is a little like a cross between nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves, which is why the spice has been named “all spice.”

7). Golpar: is a Persian spice that comes from the Persian Hogweed, which is a flowering plant native to Iran. The seedpods of the Golpar are said to have a unique scent that can be aromatic or pungent.

8). Tamarind: is a fruit that comes from a tropical evergreen in West Africa, which is used to season chutneys and jam.

9). Rue: is a small, evergreen garden shrub, which has been long used as a spice.

10). Zest: is the dried peel of oranges or lemons, which is grated and added to a wide variety of dishes and baked goods. The flavor is said to be zesty, which is why the spice is called “zest.”

11). Caraway: is a spice made from seeds that have a flavor that’s similar to licorice.

12). Kaffir: comes from lime leaves that are added as a flavoring to curries and Thai foods.

13). Abodo: is a blend of spices and herbs that come from Spain, Mexico, and Brazil. This blend includes cumin and salt.

14). Allium: is the Latin name for garlic, which is a spice commonly used all around the world. It’s also known for its medicinal properties.

15). Cumin: this spice is made from the seeds of the cumin plant and has been in use since the times of the ancient Egyptians.

16). Sumac: is made from the dried red fruit of the sumac plant. After it’s dried, the fruit is then ground into a powder and is used to add a tart flavor to a wide range of dishes.

17). Jimbu: is a spice that comes from the Nepalese plant, which are ground and used to spice foods or used in traditional medicines.

18). Mahlab: is a spice that’s made from the pit of the Prunus mahaleb cherry (also known as the St. Lucie cherry). The cherry stones are cracked, and the seeds are removed, then ground to a powder to use in cooking.

19). Sabola: is the Egyptian name for pepper.

20). Bumbu: is a traditional blend of spices that comes from Indonesia.

Spices Dog Names Female

Now, here are some spices dog names girl!

21). Ginger: is made from the rhizome (root) of the ginger plant, which has pink and white flowers. The root is used to spice up food with it’s warm flavor, and is also used in natural medicinal recipes.

22). Chili: is made from spicy hot chili peppers, which are used in many types of dishes around the world.

23). Poppy: the seeds of the poppy plant are dried, ground and then used in dishes and baking. It also works to help people sleep better and relieve coughs.

24). Cacao: are beans that come from different countries around the world including Guatemala, the Dominican Republic, and more. The beans are used to make chocolate, spice drinks and dishes.

25). Cinnamon: this is a reddish-brown spice that has a sweet, yet savory flavor. It comes from the bark of a tree in the Cassia family. It’s used in dishes and for baking, and is also known for its medicinal properties.

26). Cori: this is short for the spice called coriander, which is a seed from the plant of the same name. The flavor is said to be a bit like tangy citrus.

27). Sesame: are small seeds that can be used whole or ground into a powder. They have a nutty flavor and can be used in many types of recipes.

28). Nutmeg: is a spice that comes from the nutmeg tree. It has warm, sweet flavor and often compliments cinnamon.

29). Clove: is a spice that’s made from the dried buds of the tree of the same name. This spice has a bold flavor and is used in a wide variety of dishes and baking.

30). Mustard seed: these are small, round seeds that come from the mustard plant.

31). Saffron: is an orange-yellow spice, what has a sweet flavor and smell.

32). Safflower: comes from a thistle-like plant of the same name, which is commercial grown for its oil. However, the seeds are sometimes used as a substitute for saffron in some recipes.

33). Halywn: is the Welsh word for salt.

34). Masala: is a combination of Indian spices including cinnamon, mace, peppercorns, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, and cardamon pods.

35). Anise: is a Mediterranean spice that tastes somewhat like licorice.

36). Annatto: is a food coloring and condiment made from the seeds of the Achiote tree.

37). Ajwain: is an Indian seed that has a pungent, bitter flavor and is often added to curries and pickles.

38). Charoli: are almond flavored seeds that are used as a cooking spice in India. The seeds come from the Buchanania lanzan plant. The seeds are also commonly referred to as chironji seeds or almondettes.

39). Cayenne: is a pungent, hot-tasting red powder made from ground, dried chili peppers.

40). Canella: is a tree that’s native to the Caribbean—from Florida to Barbados. The bark of the tree is used as a spice similar to cinnamon.

More Spice-Inspired Dog Names

Here are a few more spice-inspired dog names for you to consider!

41). Aji: is a chili pepper that is to vary from mild to very hot. This chili pepper is grown in South America.

42). Chive: is a small Eurasian plant that’s related to the onion. It has purple flowers and long leaves that are tubular. The leaves are used as the spice in many types of dishes.

43). Rosemary: is a fragrant herb that comes from an evergreen plant, which originates in the Mediterranean.

44). Sriracha: is a vibrant red condiment that’s made from a mixture of chiles, salt, sugar, garlic, distilled vinegar, and more. It’s very popular in Thai cooking.

45). Thyme: is a low-growing plant in the mint family. The leaves of the plant are used in cooking and are also known for their medicinal properties.

46). Chicory: is a plant that has blue flowers, which originates in the Mediterranean. It’s related to the daisy. The flower and root are used in salads and other types of dishes.

47). Hyssop: is a small plant in the mint family. The leaves have a bitter/mint flavor and are used in cooking and herbal medicines.

48). Marjoram: is another herb used in cooking. This plant comes from southern Europe and is related to the mint family.

49). Sage: is an herb that’s used in cooking and is also used for medicinal purposes.

50). Parsley: is another herb that comes from the Mediterranean. The leaves have long been used for garnishing and flavoring foods—right back to ancient Greek and Roman times.

Can Dogs Taste or Eat Spicy Foods?

Many people love spicy foods—in fact, the hotter the better! But what about dogs? Can they taste spicy foods? Is it OK to let them eat spicy foods?

It’s an interesting fact that dogs only have about a sixth of the number of tastebuds that we pet parents have. And what’s more, a dog’s tastebuds are located farther back on the tongue. They’re better able to distinguish bitter and sour flavors.

While spicy foods may taste good to us, many dogs are not happy with the flavors. In fact, you may notice a dog reacting by drinking a large amount of water after eating something spicy. They may also lick their lips, pace, shake their head, and more. The hot spices can also cause digestive tract issues for dogs including nausea, vomiting, gas, and diarrhea.

So, it’s best not to feed your dog spicy foods. That is, unless he really seems to enjoy them. And if he does, then only allow your fur baby to have a small amount of any type of spicy food. More could make him very sick.

If your canine companion does react to eating spicy food, you can:

We hope you’ve enjoyed this article and that you’ve been able to find a wonderful, unique spicy name for your dog!

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Kim

Kim is a talented author, who loves animals especially dogs. She engaged in writing books and articles relating to animals a decade ago. Kim resides in Chicago with her husband and son. The family is the proud owner of a dog and a parrot (Jack and Lily). Kim wanted more than these two pets, but her husband put his foot down... She often visits elementary schools to talk to the kids about what she learned about pets and how they could learn from them.

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