Can Dogs Eat Fig Newtons?

By Tom •  Updated: 06/14/22 •  7 min read
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Can Dogs Eat Fig Newtons

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Fig Newtons are a delicious snack that many pet parents love! But what happens if a dog eats these wonderful treats? And if you’re eating a Fig Newton, is it OK to share with your fur baby? These are a couple of the questions we’ll review in this article!

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If you’d like to learn whether Fig Newtons are safe for your dog, then read on! We’ve put together all the information you need to make an informed decision on sharing these great snacks with your dog or not!

What are Fig Newtons?

Fig Newtons are an iconic cookie that was developed in the US by a cookie baker in Philadephia and an inventor in Florida! When these two got together, they merged over 100 bakeries in New York and Chicago.

Also, about this time, Nabisco first became a company with a baker in Chicago. Today, the company is one of the largest bakeries in the world, with over 1200 workers.

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The cookie maker in this merger was Charles M. Roser. He was the first guy who based his fig rolls on a recipe for homemade cookies that originally came to the US with British immigrants. The cookies included a crumbly pastry with a scoop of fig jam in the middle. What could be better than this yummy combination?

Today, Fig Newtons are produced by the Nabisco company, which has kept the basic recipe for these cookies almost the same as the original. Fig Newtons include the following ingredients:

So, are Fig Newtons safe for dogs to eat? Can your dog get sick from eating Fig Newtons?

Fig Newtons Not Toxic to Dogs

The good news is that Fig Newtons are not toxic to dogs. So, your fur baby won’t be poisoned by the cookies. That’s a good thing! However, even though the ingredients are not toxic to dogs, these cookies are not really a healthy treat for dogs.

One problem is that the cookies are high in calories and can lead to obesity. However, a dog would have to eat several Fig Newtons a day to gain weight very quickly. However, there are also some other considerations.

Figs are a healthy fruit for dogs. They’re high in fiber and can help keep your dog’s digestive tract working correctly. That means figs could help with constipation. The fruit also contains omega fatty acids that boost both the immune system and the brain.

However, figs can cause allergic reactions in some dogs, especially when eaten in large amounts. For these reasons, it’s best to only give your dog a small bite of Fig Newtons once in a while.

What’s more, the cookies also contain sugar, salt, and other ingredients that can be harmful to dogs in large amounts. These ingredients can cause GI upset in dogs, especially those who have sensitive stomachs.

For instance, too much sugar can cause GI problems, tooth decay, arthritis, diabetes, and more. In addition, the cookies contain high amounts of salt. Salt can cause high blood pressure, heart disease, and kidney problems in dogs. What’s more, the cookies are high in calories. If a dog eats several of these cookies there’s a chance he could become hyperactive.

These are the reasons Fig Newtons are not good as a regular treat for our canine companions.

Can Fig Newtons Cause an Allergic Reaction in Dogs?

Another problem is that it’s possible that some dogs may be allergic to some of the ingredients in Fig Newtons. Dogs can be allergic to many things, just like us.

While figs are not a common allergen for dogs, it’s possible a dog could develop breathing problems, skin rash, hives, swelling of the mouth and face, and more if he’s allergic to any of the ingredients in these cookies.

What Happens If Your Dog Eats Several Fig Newtons?

The answer depends on your dog’s size and weight. For instance, a small dog may eat several Fig Newtons and end up with an upset stomach. However, a larger dog eating the same number of cookies may be just fine.

However, if a dog eats a lot of these cookies in one sitting, except that he will develop nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In most cases, these symptoms will clear up in a few hours. However, if they last longer than 24 hours, it’s important to call the vet. There’s the danger that your dog could become dehydrated from continuous bouts of vomiting and diarrhea.

What about dogs that have diabetes? If your dog has this condition and eats a lot of Fig Newtons, it’s best to call the vet. This may not be a life-threatening situation, but your dog could become very sick.

What to Do If Your Dog Loves Fig Newtons

If your fur baby really loves Fig Newtons and isn’t allergic to any of the ingredients, why not consider making him a doggie alternative to these yummy cookies?

When you make a homemade version that’s safe for dogs, it’s possible to control the amount of sugar and other ingredients in the cookies. Plus, you won’t have to include any of the artificial flavorings or preservatives, so your doggie cookies will be a much healthier option for your fur baby!

Fig Newton-Alternative Recipe for Dogs

Here’s our Fig Newton alternative for dogs that you can make at home!

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Use a saucepan to soak the figs in orange juice and water for at least an hour. (If you’re worried about the extra sugar in orange juice, just soak the figs in water).
  2. Cook this mixture over medium heat until the figs are soft and can easily be mashed (about 20 minutes).
  3. Remove from heat and mash or blend until it makes a spreadable paste.
  4. Set aside the fig mixture.
  5. In a mixing bowl, combine applesauce, coconut oil, and water.
  6. In a separate bowl, combine oat flour, baking powder, and ground cinnamon.
  7. Slowly add dry ingredients to the wet mixture.
  8. Continue stirring until dough is completely blended together and smooth.
  9. Use a rolling pin to roll out dough to about ¼” thick.
  10. Spread fig mixture along one side of the dough.
  11. Fold the dough over so the fig mixture is sandwiched in the center.
  12. Slice the dough & fig combination into small sizes appropriate for your dog, then arrange these on a baking sheet. The baking sheet can be lined with parchment paper or a silicone mat.
  13. Bake dog treats at 350 F for 12 minutes or until the dough is slightly browned.
  14. When the dog treats are finished baking, remove them from the baking sheet and allow them to cool completely before storing in an airtight container or serving them to your dog (who has probably been begging the entire time you’ve been working!).

Summing It Up

So, there you have it! While Fig Newtons are not toxic to dogs, they’re also not a very healthy snack for dogs. For this reason, you may want to consider making our Fig Newton Alternatives for your fur baby to enjoy!

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Tom

Tom has always loved to write since he was little - he wanted to be either a writer or a veterinary doctor, but he ended up being a professional writer while most of his works are based on animals. He was born in San Francisco but later moved to Texas to continue his job as a writer. He graduated from the University of San Francisco where he studied biotechnology. He is happily married and a soon to be father!
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