My Dog’s Breath Smells Like Metal

By Julie •  Updated: 11/17/21 •  3 min read
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Most dogs have unpleasant breath to our pet parent’s nose. But that’s OK! A dog’s normal breath may not smell so good to us, yet it’s a sign your dog is healthy! However, if your dog’s breath suddenly becomes foul and/or smells like metal, then this could be an indication of a health issue.

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Has your dog’s breath begun to smell like metal? Are you worried this could be a sign that your dog is sick? If so, then you’ve come to the right place. We understand it can be scary when your dog develops a weird symptom like this.

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In this article, we’ll take a look at some of the most common causes of metal-smelling breath in dogs and how you can help your dog. Let’s get started!

First Check This!

One of the most common causes of metal-smelling breath in dogs is impacted anal glands. The glands are located on either side of the anus. Sometimes they can become full and develop a metallic or even a fishy smell. If your dog has this problem, he may be licking this area quite a lot to find relief.

If you suspect this could be a problem with your dog, then it’s time to call the vet for help.

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Other Reasons a Dog’s Breath Smells Like Metal

Here are some other reasons that a dog’s breath may begin to smell like metal.

Chew toys/bones/sticks: the things your dog likes to chew on could be causing his metal-smelling breath. This is because some hard toys, bones, sticks, and more may splinter. The result is sharp pieces that can cause tears and punctures, along with bleeding in the dog’s mouth.

Kidney problems: dogs with kidney failure may develop metallic-smelling breath. That’s because the kidneys aren’t able to function correctly. This causes a build-up of toxic waste in the dog’s system, which can also lead a dog’s breath to smell like metal.

Ulcers: stomach ulcers are another common problem that can cause a dog’s breath to smell like metal.

Teething: in puppies, their breath may smell metallic when they’re teething. This is a normal issue; however, if you’re concerned, then definitely call the vet about this.

Poor dental hygiene: can also cause a dog’s breath to smell like metal. Rotting teeth, gingivitis, gum infections, abscesses, and more are very common problems in dogs.

How to Help Your Dog

If you’re not able to figure out precisely what’s causing your dog’s breath to smell like metal, then it’s time to call the vet. However, even if you believe you know what’s causing the problem, it’s still a good idea to take your canine companion in for a checkup.

The vet can find out what’s causing your dog’s foul breath and then treat the problem. The good news is that treating the underlying problem usually returns a dog’s breath back to normal doggie breath!

So, be sure to take your fur baby in for a checkup. You’ll both feel better and will enjoy being close once again!

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Julie

Julie is a graduate of the University of North Carolina, Wilmington, where she studied Animal science. Though contrary to the opinion of her parents she was meant to study pharmacy, but she was in love with animals especially cats. Julie currently works in an animal research institute (NGO) in California and loves spending quality time with her little cat. She has the passion for making research about animals, how they survive, their way of life among others and publishes it. Julie is also happily married with two kids.
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