My Dog Drank Windex What Should I Do?

By Kyoko •  Updated: 11/11/20 •  3 min read
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We keep many household cleaners in our homes, some of which can be dangerous to our fur babies. One product that can be toxic to dogs is Windex.

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What is in Windex?

Windex is a brand of window and glass cleaner that was first developed by the Drackett Company back in 1933. Since then, it has been a highly popular choice when it comes to cleaning windows, mirrors, and glass items.

Can My Dog Be Lactose Intolerant?
Can My Dog Be Lactose Intolerant?

Classic Windex contains the following ingredients:

Many of these substances can be toxic for us and for our dogs.

Symptoms of Windex Poisoning in Dogs

You may notice some of these symptoms if your dog has ingested Windex:

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If you know for sure or suspect that your dog has ingested Windex, please call the vet immediately. This is a medical emergency. Even a small amount of Windex can make a dog very sick.

Diagnosis of Windex Poisoning in Dogs

Even if your dog’s not showing any symptoms, he will still need to see the vet. It’s possible that toxins may not cause any symptoms until a few hours later.

When you reach the vet, they will do a physical exam of your dog, and will order lab tests. Treatment may include administration of fluids, pain medication, anti-inflammatories, and possibly antibiotics. Other treatment will depend on where the damage has occurred (eyes, skin, stomach, etc.). And your fur baby will probably have to stay in the hospital one or more days as he recovers. The vet will monitor for any other symptoms or signs of trouble.

Even after your dog comes home, there may be an extensive time of healing needed for a full recovery.

Most dogs will have a full recovery if they’ve received fast medical treatment. This is key to saving your dog’s life.

Because Windex and other cleaners can be very toxic to dogs, it’s important to keep these out of your dog’s reach. If your dog is especially adept at getting into closets and cabinets, then keep cleaning products up high.

You may also want to consider adding child locks to those cabinets or closets your dog can open easily. This way you’ll keep him safe from being poisoned by Windex and other household cleaners in the future.

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Kyoko

Kyoko is from a family of 3 and moved to New York with her parents and siblings when she was 13. Kyoko is fond of spending a great amount of time with pets, specifically her beagle Luna and cat Missy. Her boyfriend often complains that she spends too much time giving attention to their animals. Kyoko has written dozens of articles concerning pets and is aiming at owning a pet shop one day!

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