My Dog Ate Seroquel or Quetiapine What Should I Do?

By Kim •  Updated: 09/21/20 •  3 min read
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Does anyone in your home take a medication called Seroquel (Quetiapine)? If so, then it’s important to keep this away from your dog.

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What is Seroquel?

Seroquel, also called quetiapine, is an antipsychotic medication that’s used to treat schizophrenia, mania, and depression in those who have bipolar disorder. This drug works to restore the balance of neurotransmitters in the brain.

In humans, this medication can help to improve concentration, reduce hallucinations, and help people feel more positive, feel less nervous, and more. Seroquel may also help some people improve their mode, sleep, appetite and energy levels.

While this medication is helpful for humans, it can be poisonous to dogs.

Dogs Ingesting Human Medications

Our fur babies are curious about everything. When they see us eating something, they assume it’s something yummy and want it, too! A small treat once in a while is OK; however, if a dog somehow gains access to our medications, this can have disastrous effects.

If your dog can reach prescription bottles, he may chew the bottle and also eat some of the medicine inside. This is one way a dog can get to our human medications.

Another way is if we accidentally drop a pill on the floor and can’t find it, or our dog jumps on it fast and swallows it. Dogs eating human medications and being poisoned is a major problem.

Symptoms of Seroquel Poisoning in Dogs

You may notice signs about 1-2 hours after your dog ingests a Seroquel tablet, unless he’s eaten an extended release pill. The signs to watch for include:

If you believe your dog has swallowed a Seroquel pill, then be sure to call the vet immediately. This could be a life-threatening medical emergency.

When calling the vet, be sure to let the vet know the dose of the pill, and about how many pills your fur baby has eaten.

Treatment of Seroquel Poisoning

The vet may choose to induce vomiting if your fur baby recently ate the pill and is not sedated. They may also use activated charcoal, which keeps the medication from being absorbed into the digestive tract. In addition, your dog may require IV fluids to keep him hydrated. The vet may also use other medical treatments to support your dog and relieve symptoms.

The prognosis for your dog is excellent, if he receives quick treatment. And the best way to keep this type of accident from happening in the future is to keep all medications out of your dog’s reach, and quickly find and pick up any pills that are accidentally dropped. Then you won’t have to worry about your dog eating your medication.

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Kim

Kim is a talented author, who loves animals especially dogs. She engaged in writing books and articles relating to animals a decade ago. Kim resides in Chicago with her husband and son. The family is the proud owner of a dog and a parrot (Jack and Lily). Kim wanted more than these two pets, but her husband put his foot down... She often visits elementary schools to talk to the kids about what she learned about pets and how they could learn from them.

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