My Dog Ate a Hornet What Should I Do?

Reviewed By Kim •  Updated: 09/06/20 •  3 min read
Dog Moderate Toxicity Level
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During the warmer months of the year, it’s more common to hornets buzzing around. People know to avoid these stinging insects. But for some reason, there are dogs who are very captivated with these flying bugs.

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What is a Hornet?

Trying to tell the difference between a hornet and a wasp can be confusing. In addition, some people use these names interchangeably. Both wasps and hornets are venomous insects. So, what’s the difference between a wasp and a hornet?

Wasps and hornets are related; in fact, hornets are a type of wasp. However, hornets look a little bit different from their wasp relatives. For one thing, hornets are much larger and longer. They usually have a thin waist, like other wasps, but their abdomen is larger than a wasp’s. And their colors may be black & white, or brownish-reddish. In addition, hornets carry more venom than wasps.

Hornets tend to build paper-like nests in trees or other high places; sometimes the nests resemble papier Mache. Their usual prey are other insects and they rarely go after anything sweet.

It is strongly recommended to contact a Pet Poison Helpline or your veterinarian.

Hornets will usually not attack unless they are provoked or are trying to defend themselves or their nest. In most cases, their venom is not deadly for a dog, unless the dog is allergic to the venom or is stung multiple times.

What if My Dog Eats a Hornet?  

One thing you’ll need to be concerned about is if the hornet had a chance to sting your fur baby. You’ll need to check your dog’s lips, mouth, and throat to see if a stinger has become lodged in these places. And check for swelling—the barb may not be there, but hornet could have had a chance to sting your canine companion.

On the other hand, if the hornet went right down, then chances are it will pass through your dog’s digestive tract and come out the other end with no problem. The very worst is that your dog could suffer from nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting.

However, as mentioned previously, you’ll need to monitor your dog for any signs of an allergic or anaphylactic reaction. Your dog could have any one or more of these symptoms:

If you notice any of these symptoms, then call the vet immediately, as this could be a medical emergency.

In most cases, if your fur baby hasn’t been stung, the hornet will pass through without any problems. But it’s always good to be aware that some dogs could have a serious allergic reaction, which requires prompt medical treatment.

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Kim

Kim is a talented author, who loves animals especially dogs. She engaged in writing books and articles relating to animals a decade ago. Kim resides in Chicago with her husband and son. The family is the proud owner of a dog and a parrot (Jack and Lily). Kim wanted more than these two pets, but her husband put his foot down... She often visits elementary schools to talk to the kids about what she learned about pets and how they could learn from them.

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