My Dog Ate A Dead Wasp What Should I Do?

By Julie •  Updated: 10/09/22 •  3 min read
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My Dog Ate A Dead Wasp What Should I Do?

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Some dogs have a penchant for chasing anything that runs or flies, including wasps! The insects may attract a dog. They find it fun and challenging to see if they can catch these fast-moving bugs! But what happens if a dog finds and eats a dead wasp?

Has your dog eaten a dead wasp? Are you worried the dead wasp could make your dog sick? If so, you’ve come to the right place. We understand it can be scary when your dog eats something like this.

We’ve gathered information about dead wasps and whether they can make a dog sick. Let’s get started!

What is a Dead Wasp?

A wasp is a flying insect that may somewhat resemble a bee; however, they usually have narrower waists than a bee, with bodies that are also slimmer. One of the most common wasps in North America is the yellow jacket. These wasps are black and yellow, like a bee.

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Much like bees, wasps are also social insects that live in a hive with an egg-laying queen. Wasps are found all around the world. And it was interesting to learn (in our research) that wasps are also related to ants!

A dead wasp is one that is no longer living. These are sometimes found inside the window sill, out in the yard, and in other places. But can these be dangerous if a dog eats one?

Dead Wasps & Dogs

Unfortunately, dead wasps can still be dangerous for dogs. Not many people realize that dead wasps are still able to sting and release their venom. It’s even possible for a dead wasp to sting a dog’s esophagus, causing pain, itching, and swelling in the area. And in dogs that are allergic to wasp venom, it’s possible they may develop a dangerous allergic reaction called an anaphylactic reaction, which can cause death in some cases.

Another danger is if the dead wasp was killed by insecticide. Swallowing the wasp also means the dog ingests the chemicals in the insecticide. However, a dog would have to eat many wasps killed with insecticide before he had eaten enough to become poisoned by the insecticide.

Symptoms of Dead Wasp Ingestion in Dogs

You may notice these symptoms if your dog has eaten a wasp:

If you notice any of these symptoms in your dog, call the vet immediately. This is an emergency.

Treatment of Dead Wasp Ingestion in Dogs

The vet will first work on your dog’s allergic reaction. They may use antihistamines, corticosteroids, and other medications to reduce swelling and other symptoms.

If your dog is having an anaphylactic reaction, the vet may treat your dog with epinephrine. This medication helps to raise your dog’s heart rate, blood pressure, and heart activity.

In some cases, your dog may need to be hospitalized until he’s in stable condition.

The prognosis is best for dogs that receive prompt medical care. So, it’s best to always keep an eye on your dog and what he may try to eat around the house, in the yard, and on walks. Train your dog to leave dead insects alone to keep him safe and healthy!

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Julie

Julie is a graduate of the University of North Carolina, Wilmington, where she studied Animal science. Though contrary to the opinion of her parents she was meant to study pharmacy, but she was in love with animals especially cats. Julie currently works in an animal research institute (NGO) in California and loves spending quality time with her little cat. She has the passion for making research about animals, how they survive, their way of life among others and publishes it. Julie is also happily married with two kids.

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