Service Dogs For Anxiety

By Kyoko •  Updated: 11/05/22 •  3 min read
ESA
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Service Dogs For Anxiety

Service dogs are well-trained animals that perform tasks for people with disabilities. These dogs have been specifically trained to assist people with disabilities, and can also be helpful for people who are experiencing emotional distress or other psychological issues.

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Service dogs are permitted in almost all public places in the United States, including restaurants, stores, libraries, and government buildings. They are also permitted to accompany their handlers in most airlines and railroads, including buses and planes that transport people with disabilities. This is because the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires that public accommodations allow service dogs to accompany their handlers anywhere they go – so long as the dog is well-behaved and does not interfere with others.

How Service Dogs Can Help

The primary role of a service dog is to help a person who has a disability by performing tasks that assist them in daily life, whether it’s guiding them from place to place or helping them get dressed. Service dogs can be trained for many different types of assistance, such as reminding their handler to take medication, retrieving dropped items, or guiding them to the restroom. They can also be trained to help their handler with physical tasks such as opening doors, pulling wheelchairs, or helping with balance.

Service dogs are particularly helpful for people who have a wide range of disabilities. Some examples of these include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, and other mental health issues.

However, service dogs can also be very helpful for people who are experiencing emotional distress or other psychological issues. For example, some service dogs can help their handlers by interrupting anxiety-provoking situations or events by keeping them grounded if they start to panic, which could prevent a panic attack from occurring.

How to Qualify for a Service Dog

In order to qualify for a service dog, you must have a disability that prevents you from doing normal tasks on your own. This could be anything from anxiety to PTSD, but most commonly it is some type of physical or mental disability.

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Do You Qualify For An Emotional Support Animal?

We help people get the proper documentation to make their pet an official Emotional Support Animal. Online approval in minutes - Housing & Travel letters.

Once you have determined that you need a service dog, there are a few steps that must be taken in order to qualify for one. The first step is for the handler to get a prescription from a healthcare provider or some sort of licensed mental health professional. They’ll assess whether or not your condition necessitates owning a service dog, as well as if owning a service dog actually helps you.

Once approved, you can get a dog to go through training so they know how to help your life. This training will take a long time; some organizations report a minimum of six months. On top of that, you’d need to get them certified for proof of their status.

Alternatives to a Service Dog

Not everyone can afford to get a service dog, and that’s okay. If you can’t afford one, you can still benefit from an emotional support animal. These animals provide comfort and support for their owners by interrupting anxiety-provoking situations or events. They are not trained, however, as they only give companionship and support.

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Kyoko

Kyoko is from a family of 3 and moved to New York with her parents and siblings when she was 13. Kyoko is fond of spending a great amount of time with pets, specifically her beagle Luna and cat Missy. Her boyfriend often complains that she spends too much time giving attention to their animals. Kyoko has written dozens of articles concerning pets and is aiming at owning a pet shop one day!
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