Emotional Support Animal Barking

By Kyoko •  Updated: 07/03/22 •  3 min read
ESA
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Emotional Support Animal Barking

Emotional support animals (ESAs) are considered pets that provide therapeutic benefits, though they do not require a license or certification. These animals provide therapeutic support to people with a wide range of emotional and mental conditions. ESAs can provide physical comfort, calmness, reduce anxiety, stress, and improve mental health. People with mental illnesses or disabilities, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or severe anxiety, may use ESAs to assist in managing their condition.

ESA Certificate
Do You Qualify For An Emotional Support Animal?

We help people get the proper documentation to make their pet an official Emotional Support Animal. Online approval in minutes - Housing & Travel letters.

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These animals fall under the category of assistive animals, though they are not the same as service animals. Service animals are trained to perform specific tasks that are necessary for the person with a disability. These animals must be individually trained to perform their duties and are not considered regular pets.

In addition, service animals are subject to different laws than other pets. While they may be allowed in public places, they must be on a leash or harness, and they must be kept in designated areas. Service animals must also have identification cards that indicate that they are service animals. Meanwhile, this is not mandatory for emotional support animals.

Housing and Other Laws for ESAs

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) provides protection for those with disabilities, including emotional support animals. According to the ADA, an ESA is considered a “reasonable accommodation” for those with disabilities and allows an individual to bring an ESA into public and private places. However, an ESA is not required to be licensed, certified, or registered.

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) also provides specific guidelines on housing, allowing those with disabilities to have access to housing and take their emotional support animal along with them even in buildings with a no-pet policy. Landlords cannot refuse to make accommodations for an ESA, as long as those demands are reasonable.

Additionally, there are no specific laws regulating how an ESA should be kept or treated. Owners can take care of their ESAs however they wish, as long as they do not pose a threat to the safety of others. However, it is important to note that some states have laws regarding the keeping of animals and require that the animal be properly cared for and have appropriate living conditions.

ESA Certificate
Do You Qualify For An Emotional Support Animal?

We help people get the proper documentation to make their pet an official Emotional Support Animal. Online approval in minutes - Housing & Travel letters.

What if Your ESA Barks a Lot or is Rowdy?

If your ESA barks or acts aggressively, this could cause other people to feel threatened or intimidated. You should work with your emotional support animal to make sure it is not disruptive. If your ESA is not trained to act calm and relaxed in certain situations, you should find a way to provide this training. If the barking or aggressive behavior continues, you may need to ask for assistance from a professional trainer or behaviorist.

While federal and state laws allow you to take your emotional support animals to areas that would otherwise be restricted to pets, it doesn’t mean that you have free rein all the time. If your animal’s behavior becomes too much of a nuisance, you may be asked to leave.

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Kyoko

Kyoko is from a family of 3 and moved to New York with her parents and siblings when she was 13. Kyoko is fond of spending a great amount of time with pets, specifically her beagle Luna and cat Missy. Her boyfriend often complains that she spends too much time giving attention to their animals. Kyoko has written dozens of articles concerning pets and is aiming at owning a pet shop one day!

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